Kribensis in the House!

October 15, 2007

After a couple of weeks of cycling and running the tank with nothing but water, I caved to all the complaints from my son about how there are no fishies in the fish tank. We headed to the local fish store (LFS) and had a goal of coming home with some fish.

Actually, I wanted more than just fish.  I stopped by the decor section in hopes of trying to find some type of cave-like structure. As previously noted, I am planning a tank for Kribensis (aka Pelvicachromis pulcher aka Kribs).  While shopping online, I saw something called Aquael Resin Rock, though they are a bit expensive (approx $30).

The local fish store had a bunch of driftwood and some ornamental things like sunken ship, which I refuse to put into my tank. The goal for me is to try and create a biotope, like a snapshot of nature.  This means, I want to keep it as natural looking as possible.

After about an hour of perusing the tanks, I settled on getting a pair of Kribs.  One of them was brightly displaying the pink belly, the other not. So I can be sure I got at least 1 dominant fish, not so sure about the gender of the other.

In addition to the kribs, I picked up a couple bunches of live plants. Most of them background plants with the exception of the Anubias barteri. After coming home, I turned off all the aquarium lights, floated the bag with the fish to stabilize the temperature and then arranged the plants accordingly.  Thirty minutes later, the kribs were in their new home.

The kribs have already established their separate areas, leading me to believe I may have gotten 2 males in the pair. One has taken over the cave-like structure among the Mopani driftwood, while the other hangs about amongst the corner background plants.

My wife came by to look at the tank and her first question was, “Where are the fish?”. I noted the territory zones to her and sure enough they were where I said they would be. “Give them a few days to adjust,” I told her. This is one of the main differences I know of between some cichlids and other tropical fish. Kribs are not like the ever-present clown fish found in all pictures of an aquarium, instead they take their zones and will come out when the coast is clear.

I further explained that after the addition of some dither fish (fish that swim above signifying all is cool), the kribs will come out more often to explore. I’m still debating on the type of dither fish I want. From a regional perspective, I should get either some Congo Tetras. But I’m leaning more towards either Rummy Nose Tetras or some Tiger Barbs. For some reason, I’ve always had an affinity towards Tiger Barbs. When my wife first met met, I had Tiger Barbs and Corydora catfish.. maybe that has something to do with it 🙂

Anyhoo, it will be at least another 1-2 weeks before I add some more fish to the tank. I want to make sure the biological filtration is kicking in full force. I’m still debating towards a clean-up crew that will handle any excess algae.. I’m thinking some Otocinclus Catfish.

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One Response to “Kribensis in the House!”


  1. […] 19th, 2007 It appears when I initially brought home the kribs, there were 2 males instead of a male/female pair. As such, over the last week or so, the dominant […]


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